ATOC1050: Weather and the Atmosphere

We all experience the weather and the weather impacts our activities. If it is cold we need to wear a jacket on the way to class. If a big winter storm impacts Colorado it might make for great skiing in the mountains, but it also makes the roads slick and dangerous and increases the risk of avalanches. Thunderstorms can ruin our plans for a hike in the mountains and the lightning and other severe weather associated with thunderstorms can present a life threatening risk.

We all experience the weather and the weather impacts our activities. If it is cold we need to wear a jacket on the way to class. If a big winter storm impacts Colorado it might make for great skiing in the mountains, but it also makes the roads slick and dangerous and increases the risk of avalanches. Thunderstorms can ruin our plans for a hike in the mountains and the lightning and other severe weather associated with thunderstorms can present a life threatening risk. Large storms can snarl the transportation network across the country and delay us as we travel for a vacation or to visit friends and family.

This class is designed to provide you with the knowledge to understand the processes responsible for creating the weather that you experience on a daily basis. During this semester you will be asked to observe the weather around you, to find weather data on the internet, and to relate these weather observations to the topics covered in the class.

The first half of this class will provide a qualitative description of how the atmosphere works and will look at the types of weather observations that are made by meteorologists around the world. The second half of the class will focus on specific weather phenomena such as mid-latitude cyclones, blizzards, thunderstorms, and hurricanes. Throughout the class examples of historical and current weather events will be used to illustrate the concepts that are being discussed. At the end of the semester you should be able to read standard weather maps, interpret satellite images, find meteorological data and forecasts on the internet, and have an understanding of the processes that are responsible for creating the weather that you experience. Hopefully you will leave this class with a new found appreciation for the beauty and power of the weather.

Professor: Katja Friedrich
Classroom: Duane Physics Room G1B30
Meeting Time: MWF 2:00-2:50PM
Class web site: http://clouds.colorado.edu/ATOC1050 or CULearn
Class recording: https://classcapture.colorado.edu/mediasite/LoginForm/Login.aspx?ReturnUrl=%2fmediasite%2fCatalog%2fpages%2fcatalog.aspx%3fcatalogId%3d73184ac2-ba96-4469-afe8-d5ae95dd19cb
Office Hours: Monday 11AM-noon and Wednesday 3-4PM
Office Location: Duane Physics D341
e-mail: Katja.Friedrich@colorado.edu

Teaching Assistant

Meg VanSciver
Office hours/Exercise hours: Tuesday 5:00PM to 6:00PM ENVD 120 and Wednesday 5:00PM to 6:00PM STAD 136C

 

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